Weaning The Pig by J.R.Pluske, J.Le Dividich, M.W.A.Verstegen   - click for bigger image

Weaning The Pig
by J.R.Pluske, J.Le Dividich, M.W.A.Verstegen

£71.00
 

Availability: Available

Print Edition BUY NOWPrint Edition - Buy now

About this book

'Weaning the Pig: Concepts and Consequences' is a new book,written by acknowledged experts from around the world, that addresses the major issues surrounding the weaning process, both for piglets and the breeding herd, in modern-day pig production.

The post-weaned pig presents many challenges to the manager, stockperson and nutritionist, and as such is a critical phase in the overall production system. Numerous challenges are also faced by the sow, which is required to be rebred as soon as possible after weaning.

This book draws together summaries of research dealing with both piglets and the sow, and is a unique book in this regard. Accordingly, the material presented covers in detail the following areas associated with the weaning process: growth of the weaned pig, nutritional management in preparation for weaning, behavioural changes and adaptations around weaning, voluntary feed intake, digestive physiology, modulation of small intestinal integrity, the intestinal microflora and diarrhoeal diseases after weaning, intestinal immunity, nutritional requirements and intestinal requirements of the weaned pig, environmental and housing issues after weaning, saving and rearing supernumery and underprivileged piglets, and productivity and longevity of the weaned sow.

Ideal reference for all professions associated with the pig industry, and is invaluable as a text for students at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Contents:

1 Introduction 15 J.R. Pluske, J. Le Dividich and M.W.A. Verstegen
 

2 Growth of the weaned pig 17 I.H. Williams

  • 2.1 Introduction 17
  • 2.2 The potential growth of weaned pigs 17
  • 2.3 Description of growth 18
  • 2.4 The growth check at weaning 19
  • 2.5 Bodyweight at weaning - its importance for post-weaning growth 20
  • 2.6 Can weaning weight be increased by supplementary feeding? 21
  • 2.7 Do pigs stimulated to reach higher weaning weights grow faster to slaughter? 23
  • 2.8 Do pigs exhibit compensatory growth? 25
  • 2.9 The importance of weight gain in the first week after weaning 26
  • 2.10 Minimising the growth check at weaning 27
  • 2.11 Does minimising the growth check have long-term benefits? 29
  • 2.12 Conclusions 31
  • References 31

3 Nutritional management of the pig in preparation for weaning 37 R.H. King and J.R. Pluske

  • 3.1 Introduction 37
  • 3.2 The importance of weaning weight to subsequent growth 38
  • 3.3 Nutrient intake before weaning 39
  • 3.3.1 Supplying creep food in lactation 39
  • 3.3.2 Dry creep feed intake 40
  • 3.3.3 Liquid diets to enhance feed intake 41
  • 3.3.4 The effects of gender on nutrient intake of neonatal pigs 43
  • 3.4 The composition of diets offered during lactation 43
  • 3.4.1 Dietary formulation of creep diets 44
  • 3.4.2 Use of flavours in creep/starter diets 45
  • 3.4.3 Presentation of the creep diet 45
  • 3.5 Water for suckling pigs 47
  • 3.6 Conclusions 47

4 Behavioural changes and adaptations associated with weaning 53 P. Mormède and M. Hay

  • 4.1 Introduction 53
  • 4.2 Neuroendocrine consequences of weaning 54
  • 4.3 The critical role of food 54
  • 4.4 Behaviour 57
  • 4.5 Conclusion 57
  • References 58

5 Metabolic and endocrine changes around weaning 61 F.R. Dunshea

  • 5.1 Introduction 61
  • 5.2 The post-weaning check 61
  • 5.3 Effect of weaning on metabolism 65
  • 5.3.1 Lipid and carbohydrate metabolism 65
  • 5.3.2 Protein metabolism 67
  • 5.4 Hormonal status 68
  • 5.4.1 Somatotropin and insulin-like growth factor-I 68
  • 5.4.2 Insulin 72
  • 5.4.3 Hypothalamic-pituitary axis 72
  • 5.5 Conclusions 74
  • References 74

6 Factors affecting the voluntary feed intake of the weaned pig 81 P.H. Brooks and C.A. Tsourgiannis

  • 6.1 Introduction 81
  • 6.2 Feeding behaviour of piglets kept under ‘natural’ or ‘semi-natural’ conditions 81
  • 6.3 Commercial weaning practice - an event rather than a process 86
  • 6.4 Pre-weaning feed and water intake 87
  • 6.5 Relationship between pre-weaning food consumption and post-weaning growth 91
  • 6.6 Feeding behaviour of the post-weaned pig 94
  • 6.7 Feed and water intake of weaned pigs 96
  • 6.8 The significance of maintaining continuity of food intake after weaning 99
  • 6.9 The interaction between water and feed intake post weaning 102
  • 6.10 Liquid feeding post-weaning 106
  • 6.11 Conclusions 108
  • References 109

7 Digestive physiology of the weaned pig 117 H.M. Miller and R.D. Slade

  • 7.1 Introduction 117
  • 7.2 Strategies for adaptation to enteral nutrition in the neonatal pig 118
  • 7.2.1 Preparation 118
  • 7.2.2 Implementation I 120
  • 7.2.3 Perspective 1 122
  • 7.3 The weaned pig 122
  • 7.3.1 Commercial weaning 123
  • 7.3.2 Gastrointestinal, pancreatic and hepatic response 123
  • 7.3.3 Small intestine morphological response 124
  • 7.3.4 Small intestine carbohydrase and transporter response 127
  • 7.3.5 Amino acid transport 128
  • 7.3.6 Perspective 2 129
  • 7.4 Regulation of post-weaning adaptation 130
  • 7.4.1 Milk withdrawal 130
  • 7.4.2 Weaning stress 131
  • 7.4.3 Direct dietary effects 132
  • 7.4.4 Indirect dietary effects 134
  • 7.4.5 Perspective 3 138
  • References 139

8 Diet-mediated modulation of small intestinal integrity in weaned piglets 145 M.A.M. Vente-Spreeuwenberg and A.C. Beynen

  • 8.1 Introduction 145
  • 8.2 Small intestinal integrity 147
  • 8.2.1 Small intestinal morphology 148
  • 8.2.2 Mucus production 149
  • 8.2.3 Transepithelial permeability 149
  • 8.2.4 Inflammation 150
  • 8.2.5 Brush border enzyme activity 150
  • 8.2.6 Animal performance 151
  • 8.3 Modulation of small intestinal integrity by luminal nutrition 151
  • 8.3.1 Modulation by route of administration 152
  • 8.3.2 Modulation by level of energy intake 155
  • 8.3.3 Modulation by dietary components 159
  • 8.4 Concluding remarks 185
  • References 186

9 Interactions between the intestinal microflora, diet and diarrhoea and their influences on piglet health in the immediate post-weaning period 199 D.E. Hopwood and D.J. Hampson

  • 9.1 Changes in intestinal microflora at weaning 199
  • 9.2 Major enteric diseases at weaning 201
  • 9.3 Post-weaning colibacillosis (PWC) 202
  • 9.4 Factors predisposing to post-weaning colibacillosis at weaning 204
  • 9.4.1 The role of the small intestine 204
  • 9.4.2 The role of the large intestine 205
  • 9.4.3 The specific role of diet 205
  • 9.4.4 The specific role of dietary non-starch polysaccharides in PWC 206
  • 9.5 Conclusions 211
  • Acknowledgements 212
  • References 212

10 Aspects of intestinal immunity in the pig around weaning 219 M.R. King, D. Kelly, P.C.H. Morel and J.R. Pluske

  • 10.1 Introduction 219
  • 10.2 Overview of immune systems 220
  • 10.2.1 Active immunity 220
  • 10.2.2 Passive immunity 223
  • 10.3 The intestinal immune system 224
  • 10.3.1 Intestinal inflammation 227
  • 10.3.2 Oral tolerance 228
  • 10.3.3 Development of intestinal immunity 231
  • 10.4 The effect of weaning on the intestinal immune system 233
  • 10.4.1 Overview of the weaning process 233
  • 10.4.2 Alteration of intestinal morphology 234
  • 10.4.3 Activation of the intestinal immune system 236
  • 10.5 Conclusion 244
  • References 244

11 Nutritional requirements of the weaned pig 259 M.D. Tokach, S.S. Dritz, R.D. Goodband and J.L. Nelssen

  • Summary 259
  • 11.1 Introduction 259
  • 11.2 Importance of pig weight and age 259
  • 11.3 Basis of nutrient specifications for weaner pigs 262
  • 11.3.1 Ingredient selection based on digestive capacity 263
  • 11.4 Nutrient requirements of the weaned pig 264
  • 11.4.1 Energy 264
  • 11.4.2 Amino acids 264
  • 11.4.3 Other approaches to determining a requirement estimate 265
  • 11.4.4 Vitamins 268
  • 11.4.5 Minerals 269
  • 11.4.6 Post-weaning diarrhea and zinc oxide. 270
  • 11.4.7 Organic trace minerals 271
  • 11.5 Selection of ingredients for the weaned pig 272
  • 11.5.1 Energy sources 272
  • 11.5.2 Protein sources 275
  • 11.5.3 Non-nutritive Feed additives (eg., antibiotics, enzymes,organic acids, etc.) 282
  • 11.6 Example of phase feeding program for early weaned pigs 283
  • 11.6.1 SEW diet - weaning to 5 kg 283
  • 11.6.2 Transition diet - 5 to 7 kg 285
  • 11.6.3 Phase 2 - 7 to 11 kg 286
  • 11.6.4 Phase 3 - 11.5 to 23 kg 287
  • 11.7 Importance of management in the success of the nutritional program 288
  • 11.7.1 Management to encourage feed intake 289
  • 11.7.2 Adjust feeders frequently to minimize feed wastage 289
  • References 290

12 Intestinal nutrient requirements in weanling pigs 301 D. Burrin and B. Stoll

  • 12.1 Introduction 301
  • 12.2 Changes in gut physiology during weaning 301
  • 12.2.1 Acute phase 302
  • 12.2.2 Adaptive phase 304
  • 12.3 Intestinal nutrient utilization in young pigs 306
  • 12.3.1 Physiological and cellular basis of gut metabolism 307
  • 12.3.2 Major oxidative fuels 311
  • 12.3.3 Essential amino acid utilization 314
  • 12.3.4 Interactions between nutrition and enteric health and function 320
  • 12.4 Summary and perspectives 324
  • Acknowledgments 324
  • References 325

13 Environmental requirements and housing of the weaned pig 337 F. Madec, J. Le Dividich, J.R. Pluske and M.W.A. Verstegen

  • 13.1 Introduction 337
  • 13.2 Environmental requirements of the weaned pig 338
  • 13.2.1 Events related to weaning that affect thermal requirements 338
  • 13.2.2 Ambient temperature 339
  • 13.2.3 Relative humidity and ventilation 343
  • 13.2.4 Lighting 344
  • 13.2.5 Effects of non-optimal climate on performance 344
  • 13.3 Pen structure 346
  • 13.3.1 Flooring materials 346
  • 13.3.2 Feeders and waterers 346
  • 13.3.3 Stocking densities 347
  • 13.3.4 Group size 348
  • 13.4 Housing as a cause of poor health of weaned pigs 349
  • 13.4.1 Evidence that housing conditions predispose pigs to digestive disorders 349
  • 13.4.2 Impact of non-optimal indoor climate on the pig’s health status 350
  • 13.4.3 Multifactorial nature of post-weaning disorders: risk factors associated with housing and management 351
  • 13.4.4 Integrating the risk factors to improve health 353
  • 13.5 Conclusion 353
  • References 355

14 Saving and rearing underprivileged and supernumerary piglets and improving their health at weaning 361J. Le Dividich, G.P. Martineau, F. Madec and P. Orgeur

  • 14.1 Introduction 361
  • 14.2 What are underprivileged and supernumeraries? 362
  • 14.3 Reasons accounting for variation in birthweight and weaning weight 363
  • 14.3.1 Variation in birth weight 363
  • 14.3.2 Variation in weaning weight 364
  • 14.4 Differences between underprivileged and “normal” piglets 365
  • 14.4.1 Body composition 365
  • 14.4.2 Performance of underprivileged pigs 366
  • 14.5 Management practices to improve survival and growth of the underprivileged pigs 367
  • 14.5.1 Providing assistance to the underprivileged piglets at birth 368
  • 14.5.2 Cross fostering 369
  • 14.5.3 Split weaning 370
  • 14.5.4 Feeding strategy 370
  • 14.6 Growth potential of underprivileged piglets 371
  • 14.7 Supernumerary piglets 371
  • 14.7.1 Weaning at day 1-3 372
  • 14.7.2 Fostering onto a nurse sow 372
  • 14.7.3 Weaning at one week of age 372
  • 14.8 Management to improve the health of piglets 373
  • 14.8.1 All-in / All-out management system 373
  • 14.8.2 Segregation 374
  • 14.9 Conclusion: the need for research 376

15 Productivity and longevity of weaned sows 385 A. Prunier, N. Soede, H. Quesnel and B. Kemp

  • 15.1 Introduction 385
  • 15.2 Reproductive causes of culling 385
  • 15.3 Consequences of lactation and weaning on the reproductive axis 388
  • 15.3.1 Postpartum inhibition 388
  • 15.3.2 Removal of the inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitaryovarian axis at weaning 392
  • 15.4 Variation in reproductive performance: extent and sources of variation 394
  • 15.4.1 Components of fertility and prolificacy 394
  • 15.4.2 Influence of nutritional factors 394
  • 15.4.3 Influence of lactational characteristics 402
  • 15.4.4 Influence of the physical and social environment 404
  • 15.4.5 Relationships between WEI, litter size and farrowing rate 406
  • 15.5 Conclusion 408

References 409Conclusions 421List of authors 422Index 425

 

Reviews

There are no reviews for this book - be the first to review it by using the form below.

You need to be logged on to submit a review - click here to log in or sign up.

Additional information

ISBN13: 9789076998176
Format: Hardback
Pages: 432
Language: English
Published: 2003

Delivery costs for this book

This books weighs: 960g

RegionCost
UK£3.50
Europe£6.50
USA£9.50
Rest of World£9.50
SagePayMaestroMastercardVisa DebitVisa ElectronVisa